We’ve got together with the good folk of Soigneur.nl and Look Mum No Hands to put up a large scale version of our Tour de France print at the Old Street cafe in London. The print was originally designed for the cover of Soigneur’s June issue.

If you are passing through Old Street, stop by and spot the stories from Tours old and new.

Limited edition copies of the print are available now to purchase at thehandmadecyclist.com

Tour de France cover art commissioned from us by the lovely Soigneur Magazine from the Netherlands. Featuring tales and images from Tours past and present.

It was a really exciting project to work on, and a challenge to try and squeeze as many classic Tour elements as possible into one piece.

I’m really happy with the end result - loved working on this one. Prints are available to purchase here

New print - ‘Vive Le Tour!’

Vive Le Tour! traces the history of the Tour de France, joining the dots from the Yorkshire Grand Depart back through 101 editions of the world’s greatest race to the pioneering early editions.

Specially commissioned for the cover of Soigneur magazine, the artwork features landmarks from the 2014 editions alongside some of the sights and legends that have made the Tour.

Details include the rainy Yorkshire Dales, the Caisse Desert atop the Col d’Izoard, the Arc du Triomphe, and a bear lurking among the mists of the Pyrénées to catch the fearful pioneers of the earliest editions of the race.

Along the route it commemorates the 100th anniversary of World War 1, watched over by pilot Marie Marvingt (the first in a long line of female riders to protest at the lack of a women’s Tour) as the road winds through the sunflowers and lavender fields of la belle France.

Printed in a numbered limited edition of 101 (one for each edition of the Tour). Available here.

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 91
2005 “Finally, the last thing I’ll say to the people who don’t believe in cycling: the cynics and the sceptics.
I’m sorry for you. I’m sorry that you can’t dream big. I’m sorry you don’t believe in miracles.
But this is one hell of a race. This is a great sporting event and you should stand around and believe it. You should believe in these athletes, and you should believe in these people.
“I’ll be a fan of the Tour de France for as long as I live. And there are no secrets - this is a hard sporting event and hard work wins it.”
- Lance Armstrong’s retirement speech
Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 91

2005 “Finally, the last thing I’ll say to the people who don’t believe in cycling: the cynics and the sceptics.

I’m sorry for you. I’m sorry that you can’t dream big. I’m sorry you don’t believe in miracles.

But this is one hell of a race. This is a great sporting event and you should stand around and believe it. You should believe in these athletes, and you should believe in these people.

“I’ll be a fan of the Tour de France for as long as I live. And there are no secrets - this is a hard sporting event and hard work wins it.”

- Lance Armstrong’s retirement speech

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 91
2004 The Tour is famous for allowing fans open access to the roads and riders, leading to some impressive tributes, costumes and incidents over the years.
Not content with simply writing the names of his heroes on the road, one fan in the small Walloon village of Aywaille created a more interesting homage to the world’s greatest riders.
He spent two years building a majestic arch for the peleton to, ahem, pass through. It was made out of some 84,000 toilet rolls.
Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 91

2004 The Tour is famous for allowing fans open access to the roads and riders, leading to some impressive tributes, costumes and incidents over the years.

Not content with simply writing the names of his heroes on the road, one fan in the small Walloon village of Aywaille created a more interesting homage to the world’s greatest riders.

He spent two years building a majestic arch for the peleton to, ahem, pass through. It was made out of some 84,000 toilet rolls.

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 90
2003 Tyler Hamilton may have good reason to believe in a commonly held Italian superstition.
Many Italian riders believe they could be the victim of bad luck if they pass salt to one another during team meals. Some even use their own salt shaker and refuse to touch another.
The reason? They think spilt salt causes the devil to appear and get up to mischief.
Tyler Hamilton believed this spiritual myth and also wore a vial of holy water and salt round his neck. One day he forgot to wear it - and what happened? He cracked his collarbone on the first stage
Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 90

2003 Tyler Hamilton may have good reason to believe in a commonly held Italian superstition.

Many Italian riders believe they could be the victim of bad luck if they pass salt to one another during team meals. Some even use their own salt shaker and refuse to touch another.

The reason? They think spilt salt causes the devil to appear and get up to mischief.

Tyler Hamilton believed this spiritual myth and also wore a vial of holy water and salt round his neck. One day he forgot to wear it - and what happened? He cracked his collarbone on the first stage

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 89
2002 Ivan Basso grew up next door to Claudio Chiappucci, who no doubt passed on the odd bit of advice about the world of the cycling elite. He probably didn’t warn Basso about some of its more curious training practices.
Basso was taken on a team-bonding exercise on a boat in the Mediterranean and told to put on a wetsuit, given a surfboard, thrown overboard and told to find his way back to shore. One problem… he can’t swim.
Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 89

2002 Ivan Basso grew up next door to Claudio Chiappucci, who no doubt passed on the odd bit of advice about the world of the cycling elite. He probably didn’t warn Basso about some of its more curious training practices.

Basso was taken on a team-bonding exercise on a boat in the Mediterranean and told to put on a wetsuit, given a surfboard, thrown overboard and told to find his way back to shore. One problem… he can’t swim.

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 88
2001 There is no greater prize for a French rider than a Tour stage on Bastille Day.
Before 2001, only three French coureurs had ever achieved the dream on two occasions. On a greasy, damp day in Alsace, France held its breath.
One of the country’s heroes, Laurent ‘The Panda’ Jalabert was in the twilight of his career, but he rose to the occasion, attacking every descent in the treacherous conditions to win alone.
A sprinter by trade, Jalabert won the King of the Mountains competition in 2001 to become one of the few riders to have won both the green and polka-dot jerseys..
Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 88

2001 There is no greater prize for a French rider than a Tour stage on Bastille Day.

Before 2001, only three French coureurs had ever achieved the dream on two occasions. On a greasy, damp day in Alsace, France held its breath.

One of the country’s heroes, Laurent ‘The Panda’ Jalabert was in the twilight of his career, but he rose to the occasion, attacking every descent in the treacherous conditions to win alone.

A sprinter by trade, Jalabert won the King of the Mountains competition in 2001 to become one of the few riders to have won both the green and polka-dot jerseys..

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 86
1999 Luis Herrera, the first Colombian to win a jersey at the Tour de France, was meandering in his garden when he was snatched at gunpoint by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Columbia.He was driven to a remote spot when it dawned on his capturers whom they had actually caught.When they realised he said “The whole time they asked me endless questions about l’Alpe d’Huez, Lagos De Covadonga and La Linea (an epic Colombian climb) as though it was perfectly fine to have a pleasant conversation.”Being avid cycling fans they finally released their national hero.
Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 86

1999 Luis Herrera, the first Colombian to win a jersey at the Tour de France, was meandering in his garden when he was snatched at gunpoint by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Columbia.

He was driven to a remote spot when it dawned on his capturers whom they had actually caught.

When they realised he said “The whole time they asked me endless questions about l’Alpe d’Huez, Lagos De Covadonga and La Linea (an epic Colombian climb) as though it was perfectly fine to have a pleasant conversation.”

Being avid cycling fans they finally released their national hero.

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 85
1998 What do a zebra, a tiger, a muscle suit and Julius Caesar have in common? Why, Mario Cipollini’s wardrobe of course.
The crowds loved Cipollini’s flamboyant style but the commissars didn’t - he was often heavily fined for breaking various rules.
His sponsors, however, delighted in the extra publicity and often picked up the bill. When his infamous ‘muscles’ skinsuit was sold at a charity auction it fetched an amazing $43,000.
Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 85

1998 What do a zebra, a tiger, a muscle suit and Julius Caesar have in common? Why, Mario Cipollini’s wardrobe of course.

The crowds loved Cipollini’s flamboyant style but the commissars didn’t - he was often heavily fined for breaking various rules.

His sponsors, however, delighted in the extra publicity and often picked up the bill. When his infamous ‘muscles’ skinsuit was sold at a charity auction it fetched an amazing $43,000.

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 84
1997 Since 1994 the riders have been timed on their ascent of Alpe D’Huez (there are technically 22 bends as the first bend is numbered ‘zero’).
Marco ‘Il Pirata’ Pantini holds the record of 37 minutes 35 seconds. His time was set at the height of cycling’s disgraced EPO era, and has never been beaten.
“I felt the crowd close in and shout my name on the passes. I felt people’s breath on me and it made the hairs on my arms stand up on end. I’ll never feel that fulfilled again,” he enthused.

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com


A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 84

1997 Since 1994 the riders have been timed on their ascent of Alpe D’Huez (there are technically 22 bends as the first bend is numbered ‘zero’).

Marco ‘Il Pirata’ Pantini holds the record of 37 minutes 35 seconds. His time was set at the height of cycling’s disgraced EPO era, and has never been beaten.

“I felt the crowd close in and shout my name on the passes. I felt people’s breath on me and it made the hairs on my arms stand up on end. I’ll never feel that fulfilled again,” he enthused.

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 83
1996 It is inconceivable now to think that riders would not wear helmets when you see them hurtling down a mountainside at 70kph, but it took the horrific death of Italian rider Fabio Casartelli before helmets were finally made compulsory in 1996.
No-one really knows what happened on the slopes of Portet-d’Aspet other than the riders lost control. Casartelli’s head hit a rock and some argue that had he worn a helmet it may have saved his life.
Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com


A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 83

1996 It is inconceivable now to think that riders would not wear helmets when you see them hurtling down a mountainside at 70kph, but it took the horrific death of Italian rider Fabio Casartelli before helmets were finally made compulsory in 1996.

No-one really knows what happened on the slopes of Portet-d’Aspet other than the riders lost control. Casartelli’s head hit a rock and some argue that had he worn a helmet it may have saved his life.

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 82
1995 Consider if you will the superhuman physiology of 1995 Tour winner Miguel Indurain.
His blood took 7 litres of oxygen around his body per minute, compared to 3–4 litres for an ordinary person and 5–6 litres for fellow riders.
His cardiac output was 50 litres a minute; a fit amateur cyclist’s is about 25 litres. Indurain’s lung capacity was 7.8 litres, compared to an average of 6 litres.
His resting pulse was as low as 28bpm compared to the average 60–72bpm. His VO2 max was 88 ml/kg/min.

Half man, half robot perhaps.
Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com


A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 82

1995 Consider if you will the superhuman physiology of 1995 Tour winner Miguel Indurain.

His blood took 7 litres of oxygen around his body per minute, compared to 3–4 litres for an ordinary person and 5–6 litres for fellow riders.

His cardiac output was 50 litres a minute; a fit amateur cyclist’s is about 25 litres. Indurain’s lung capacity was 7.8 litres, compared to an average of 6 litres.

His resting pulse was as low as 28bpm compared to the average 60–72bpm. His VO2 max was 88 ml/kg/min.

Half man, half robot perhaps.

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 81
1994 No other sport allows spectators the chance to get so close to their heroes.
Whilst the madness on l’Alpe d’Huez must give riders a much-needed adrenaline boost after a grueling stage, the crowds can sometimes be extraordinarily reckless.
Take Wilfried Nelissen and Laurent Jalabert. Coming to the end of an exciting sprint stage they had a hideous crash. The reason?
A policeman foolishly leaned out to take a photo causing the collision.
They abandoned the tour and some say they were never quite the same riders again.
Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com


A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 81

1994 No other sport allows spectators the chance to get so close to their heroes.

Whilst the madness on l’Alpe d’Huez must give riders a much-needed adrenaline boost after a grueling stage, the crowds can sometimes be extraordinarily reckless.

Take Wilfried Nelissen and Laurent Jalabert. Coming to the end of an exciting sprint stage they had a hideous crash. The reason?

A policeman foolishly leaned out to take a photo causing the collision.

They abandoned the tour and some say they were never quite the same riders again.

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com

A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 80
1993 One of the Tour’s most recognisable faces in recent times is the infamous Red Devil, also known as Didi Senff and complete with trident.
He was inspired into costume by the German cycling announcer Herbert Watterot, who called the last lap of local criterium races The Red Devil’s Lap.
The peleton either love or loathe him and he uses his pitchfork to defend himself against water bottles thrown at him during the race.
He is also an acclaimed bicycle inventor and in the Guinness Book of Records for building ‘the world’s largest bicycle in the shape of a guitar’.
Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com


A Miscellany of Le Tour de France - Day 80

1993 One of the Tour’s most recognisable faces in recent times is the infamous Red Devil, also known as Didi Senff and complete with trident.

He was inspired into costume by the German cycling announcer Herbert Watterot, who called the last lap of local criterium races The Red Devil’s Lap.

The peleton either love or loathe him and he uses his pitchfork to defend himself against water bottles thrown at him during the race.

He is also an acclaimed bicycle inventor and in the Guinness Book of Records for building ‘the world’s largest bicycle in the shape of a guitar’.

Every day until the Grand Depart, we’ll be sharing 100 stories from the last 100 years, a design per day until the greatest show on earth begins. You can see the full set of stories, and purchase postcards and prints, at www.thehandmadecyclist.com